Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Gibson L- Century, '37

During the years 1933 and 1934 Chicago held a World’s Fair commemorating the “Century of Progress” since the time of its incorporation. The fair was meant to stimulate the local economy during the crisis of the Great Depression. It was very successful and well attended.

 

 The World’s Fair received a great deal of interest from around the world; especially in nearby areas like Kalamazoo, Michigan home of the Gibson Company. Gibson decided to use the “Century of Progress” idea to name a new high end flat-top guitar. The L-Century was the result, and it was produced from 1933 through 1941.

 

 Gibson had introduced its L-series of flattops in 1926, and by 1933 offered several different models at various prices. The L-Century had the same measurements as the other L-models: 14 and ¾’ wide and 19 and ¼” long. The other differences were the use of maple for the back and sides (instead of mahogany), and of course the eye catching pearloid material covering the entire fingerboard and headstock.

 

Gibson L-00, '40

Sunburst, Serial # FG-2457.

 

Gibson J-45, '47

The Gibson J-45 has been a favorite with players and collectors since its debut in 1942. Its roots can be traced back ten years earlier with the unveiling of the Martin Guitar Company’s Dreadnought series. The Martin D series became immediately popular with players because of the increased volume these large guitars provided. Gibson retaliated in 1934 with the Jumbo. The Jumbo was a guitar with similar dimensions and volume to the Dreadnought, but with Gibson’s unique round-shouldered look that’s been considered a classic shape ever since.  The economics of the Great Depression caused the Jumbo to evolve into the lower priced, less fancy J-35 in 1936. By 1942 the J-35 was dropped in favor of the enduring J-45, which has been a staple of the Gibson Flat-Top line up ever since.

 

Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, '75

Blue Sparkle, Serial # 393787

 

Gibson J-45, '64

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 215778

This J-45 has the features common to others produced in 1964.  It has the adjustable bridge (introduced in 1956), large frets (1959), cherry sunburst (1962), and mahogany back and sides with spruce top (standard since the end of WW II).

The red tint of the cherry sunburst has faded to an almost golden color, which is common on J-45s made from ’64 through ’66.

 

The slim comfortable neck of this example has the somewhat rare and interesting feature called a “Stinger”. The back of the headstock is painted black to hide a flaw in the wood. The black paint ends in an attractive point at the bottom of the headstock while rest of the neck continues on in the usual see-through cherry.

 

Gibson Everly Brothers Model, '67

Natural, Serial # 890855

 

Taylor Custom DN, '07

Natural, Serial # 20070323122.

Made for Dave's Guitar Shop 25th Anniversary.

 

Taylor Custom GC, '07

Natural, Serial # 20070406116

Made for Dave's Guitar Shop 25th Anniversary

 

Taylor XXX-MS, '04

Natural, Serial # 20040430123, #36 of 250.

Taylor 30th Anniversary

 

Baldwin Virginian, '65

You can see the lead singer from Kentucky Headhunters using this guitar on a few of their music videos. Greg Martin tried to talk me into selling it to them, but for some strange reason I'm oddly attracted to this ugly guitar! I gave it to him to use for as long as he wanted and now it's back where it belongs!.

 

Epiphone E112 Emperor, ’62

Sunburst, Serial # 75090 Debuting in 1935 as Epiphone's top-of-the-line acoustic archtop, the Emperor was originally the company's answer to Gibson's 18" wide Super 400. By the 1950's, Epiphone was making a triple-pickup electric version. Originally called the Zepher Emperor Regent, this model name changed to Emperor Electric in 1954. Gibson continued to make an 18" wide, triple pickup Emperor Electric, but incorporated the new thinline body style used on Byrdlands and ES-335s. The 1962 Emperor pictured here has typical features for that year, including a 4-piece maple neck divided by three strips of mahogany, a rosewood fretboard with V-block inlays, a "tree of life" pattern adorning the headstock, and three gold-plated mini-humbucker pickups.
 

Epiphone A412 Triumph, '65

Sunburst, Serial #306081.

 

Paul Reed Smith Custom, 1986

Vintage Sunburst, Moons, Brazilian board and sweet switch. Extremely clean!

 
 

Epiphone E251 Broadway,'59

Serial # A 2340

 

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