Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Paul Reed Smith Custom, 1990

Royal Blue, 10 top, Birds, Brazilian board and sweet switch. The color and flame are so deep on this one, you feel like you could swin in this top!

 

Paul Reed Smith EG, 1989

Tobacco Sunburst, Maple neck, Alder body, An early one with an interesting logo!

 

Paul Reed Smith EG Prototype

Cherry, Set neck, No serial number, I bought this one from Paul out of his archive guitars. This version never made it to production!

 

Paul Reed Smith Standard, 1986

Pearl White, Brazilian board, I'm not a big fan of solid color PRS guitars, but this is a nice early example of Paul's work.

 

Hamer Keith Richards, '80

Sunburst, Serial # 0199.

The story is this: John Belushi had this one built for Keith as a gift, but it never made it to him. Supposedly there is another one floating around with Ron Wood's name on it too!

 

Hamer Sunburst, '78

Serial # 80551.

 

Hamer Sunburst, '79

Serial # 91047.

 

Hamer Sunburst, '78

Serial # 80316.

 

Hamer Sunburst, '79

Serial # 90867.

 

Hamer Sunburst, '78

Serial # 80097.

 

Guild X-375, '53

Natural, Serial # 1164.

 

Guild Starfire II, '61

Cherry, Serial # 17955

 

Guild M-75, ’58

Sunburst, Serial # 6881. The Guild company was founded in 1952 by Alfred Dronge, a music store owner and accordion distributor.  He had been approached by former Epiphone sales manager George Mann to start a guitar company using the ex-Epiphone workers who had stayed in New York when Epiphone moved its manufacturing facilities to a factory in Philadelphia. A small second floor loft in Manhattan became the original Guild factory. Guild’s early guitars consisted of large acoustic and electric archtops with clear-cut Epiphone lineage. Dronge had made many professional jazz contacts during his time as a professional guitarist and music store owner, so he was able to draw luminary supporters from the jazz scene (one early endorsee was Johnny Smith).  By 1956 Guild moved to a bigger building in Hoboken New Jersey. The new factory took up a 6,000 square foot space on the sixth floor of the Neumann Leather Building. The new location was still an easy commute for the employees living in Manhattan’s “Little Italy”.   The guitar spotlighted this month was the first in the Guild line that was not the progeny of an earlier Epiphone model. The Aristocrat M-75 was Guild’s version of the compact Gibson Les Paul, but with hollowbody type construction.  The 1954 Guild catalog stated: “The use of an exclusively developed lighter semi-solid body construction gives the Guild Aristocrat a magnificence of tone never before achieved in a guitar this size.”   The characteristics of this 1958 Aristocrat are typical of others made that year. These consist of : A spruce top, mahogany back and sides,  a 24 and ¾” scale 2-piece mahogany neck with maple center, rosewood fingerboard with block inlays, “lip top” headstock (changed to “center raised” by 1962) with pearloid Guild logo and “Chesterfield” inlay. The hardware was gold, including the Kluson tuners and harp tailpiece. The single coil pickups, while resembling Gibson P-90s, were made by an Astoria New York based company called Franz.  
 

Martin 000-18, '37

Sunburst, Serial # 68372.

The 1930’s are known in most history books as the Great Depression. It was a time of great economic hardship and poverty. This same period is also known as the “Golden Era” of Martin guitars. The innovations introduced to Martins at this time make them among the most desirable flattop guitars ever made.

 

 The two 1937 Martins share the beautiful sunburst finish seen only during Martin’s Golden Era. In 1937 the 00-18 listed for $45, while the 000-18 was $55.

 

Dave’s Comments: Both of these guitars came to my attention within 30 days of each other a few years ago. The funny thing was that they both came from different people in the same small Wisconsin town. Obviously a store in this area sold both of these Martins new back in 1937!

 

Martin 00-18, '37

Sunburst, Serial # 66879.

The 1930’s are known in most history books as the Great Depression. It was a time of great economic hardship and poverty. This same period is also known as the “Golden Era” of Martin guitars. The innovations introduced to Martins at this time make them among the most desirable flattop guitars ever made.

 

 The two 1937 Martins share the beautiful sunburst finish seen only during Martin’s Golden Era. In 1937 the 00-18 listed for $45, while the 000-18 was $55.

 

Dave’s Comments: Both of these guitars came to my attention within 30 days of each other a few years ago. The funny thing was that they both came from different people in the same small Wisconsin town. Obviously a store in this area sold both of these Martins new back in 1937!

 

Martin 000-28, '57

Natural, Serial # 155392

 

Martin 000-18, '64

Natural, Seial # 194257

 

Gibson L- Century, '37

During the years 1933 and 1934 Chicago held a World’s Fair commemorating the “Century of Progress” since the time of its incorporation. The fair was meant to stimulate the local economy during the crisis of the Great Depression. It was very successful and well attended.

 

 The World’s Fair received a great deal of interest from around the world; especially in nearby areas like Kalamazoo, Michigan home of the Gibson Company. Gibson decided to use the “Century of Progress” idea to name a new high end flat-top guitar. The L-Century was the result, and it was produced from 1933 through 1941.

 

 Gibson had introduced its L-series of flattops in 1926, and by 1933 offered several different models at various prices. The L-Century had the same measurements as the other L-models: 14 and ¾’ wide and 19 and ¼” long. The other differences were the use of maple for the back and sides (instead of mahogany), and of course the eye catching pearloid material covering the entire fingerboard and headstock.

 

Gibson L-00, '40

Sunburst, Serial # FG-2457.

 

Gibson J-45, '47

The Gibson J-45 has been a favorite with players and collectors since its debut in 1942. Its roots can be traced back ten years earlier with the unveiling of the Martin Guitar Company’s Dreadnought series. The Martin D series became immediately popular with players because of the increased volume these large guitars provided. Gibson retaliated in 1934 with the Jumbo. The Jumbo was a guitar with similar dimensions and volume to the Dreadnought, but with Gibson’s unique round-shouldered look that’s been considered a classic shape ever since.  The economics of the Great Depression caused the Jumbo to evolve into the lower priced, less fancy J-35 in 1936. By 1942 the J-35 was dropped in favor of the enduring J-45, which has been a staple of the Gibson Flat-Top line up ever since.

 

Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, '75

Blue Sparkle, Serial # 393787

 

Gibson J-45, '64

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 215778

This J-45 has the features common to others produced in 1964.  It has the adjustable bridge (introduced in 1956), large frets (1959), cherry sunburst (1962), and mahogany back and sides with spruce top (standard since the end of WW II).

The red tint of the cherry sunburst has faded to an almost golden color, which is common on J-45s made from ’64 through ’66.

 

The slim comfortable neck of this example has the somewhat rare and interesting feature called a “Stinger”. The back of the headstock is painted black to hide a flaw in the wood. The black paint ends in an attractive point at the bottom of the headstock while rest of the neck continues on in the usual see-through cherry.

 

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