Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Gibson ES-345, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 176409.

 

Gibson ES-355 '60

Cherry, Serial #A32582. A very clean example with just a bit of gold plating wear.

 

Gibson ES-355 '65

Sparkling Burgundy, The face has faded to an interesting gold color! Some nasty Gibson/Schaller tuners installed, but since the damage was already done, I left them alone.

 

National Glenwood 98, '64

White.

The National String Instrument Corporation began in 1926 and was known for making resonator guitars. National united with the Dobro Company in 1932, and eventually became Valco in 1943. Valco manufactured guitars and amps under its own National and Supro brand names as well as for other companies (Gretsch, Silvertone, Oahu, and Airline).

 

In 1961 Valco came out with an innovative new style of electric guitar made from molded fiberglass bodies called Res-O-Glas (polyester resin and glass threads combined). The most striking of these fiberglass guitars were the National Map-shaped models which included the Glenwood, Val-Pro and Newport models. The unusual cutaways on these guitars made them resemble a map of the continental United Sates.

 

The National Map-shaped guitar pictured is a 1964 Glenwood 98. It has two standard single-coil pickups along with a bridge pickup. Controlling the pickups are three tones, three volumes, and a selector switch. A master volume is located near the jack. The hardware consists of chrome Grover Rotomatic tuners and a Bigsby vibrato. The body is white, while the finish on the back of the neck is black.

 

 

Gibson ES-330, '61

Cherry, Serial # 19764.

 

Gibson ES-330, '67

Sparkling Burgundy, Serial # 064094.

 

Gibson ES-335, '67

Sparkling Burgundy, Serial # 170009.

This guitar is weird not just because of the color, but because it has split parallelogram fingerboard inlays like an ES-345.

 

Gibson ES-335, '67

Pelham Blue, Serial # 87604.

 

Gibson ES-335, '63

Cherry, Serial # 113991.

 

Gibson ES-335, '62

Cherry, Serial # 51989.

 

Gibson ES-335, '64

Cherry, Serial # 147790.

 

Gibson ES-335, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 66165.

 

Gibson ES-335, '63

Sunburst, #139877.

 

Gibson ES-335, '61

Sunburst, #10086.

 

Gibson ES-335, '61

Cherry, Serial # A35742.

 

Gibson ES-335, '58

Sunburst, Serial # A28163.

 In the late ‘50s Gibson designed a guitar meant to have the look and feel of a traditional hollowbody, while also having the sonic advantages of a solid body guitar (still new and not universally accepted). The ES-335 was the result.

 This example has features common to most late ‘50s 335s: dot inlays, long pickguard, see-through gold bell knobs, and PAF humbuckers.

Early ES-335s, including this one, often have shallow neck angles. The ABR-1 bridges on these guitars are shaved much thinner than usual to accommodate the neck angle.

Factory installed Bigsbys were also a common feature on ES-335s of the ‘50s and ‘60s. What makes this guitar unusual is the lack of stop tailpiece holes or “Custom Made” plaque usually seen on Bigsby equipped 335s.

 I purchased this guitar from a good friend & fellow dealer in Iowa about 20 years ago. Not the best playing ES-335 that I own (because of the shallow neck angle) but definitely a historically significant guitar that I treasure. 

 

Gibson ES-175, '62

Sunburst, Serial # 85879.

 

Gibson ES-175, '61

Sunburst, Serial # A35924.

A very clean guitar that is a recent addition to the collection. This is complete with the Brown case, all of the hang tags, and the paperwork. The original sales receipt that is dated July 8, 1961 is also included. This guitar sold new for $249.50 and the case was an extra $47.00. What are the chances of the $30 trade credit being for a Danelectro or a Silvertone? One can only imagine.

 

Gibson ES-295, '52

Gold, Serial # A11855.

You do not see these very often, This one is a bit weather checked and way too cool!

 

Gibson ES-225 TDN, ’59

Natural In 1955 Gibson developed a line of thin-bodied electric guitars to appeal to players wanting a smaller more comfortable instrument, but without the weight of a solid body guitar. This line consisted of three guitars: The upscale Byrdland, the mid-priced ES-350T, and the economy ES-225T.   The ES-225T looked much like a plainer ES-175, but measured only 1 and ¾” deep (compared to the ES-175’s 3 and 3/8” depth). When it first debuted in the summer of 1955, it had only a single pickup mid-way between the neck and the bridge. By the summer of 1956, successful sales drove Gibson to introduce a natural finish option, and a two pickup version. The 1959 Gibson catalog states: “The ES-225T series of thin-bodied, cutaway guitars offer outstanding professional instruments in the popular priced field. Combining the rigidity and tone features of a solid body guitar with the light weight, easy-to-hold shape of conventional styling, these instruments are available in single or double pickup models.”   The 1959 ES-225 TDN pictured has all the features typical of that model including: a laminated maple top, back and sides, a single bound top and back, 24 and ¾” scale mahogany neck with bound 20 fret rosewood fingerboard, and two P-90 single coil pickups. The strings are held in place by an original Les Paul style combination bridge-tailpiece.
 

Gibson ES-295, '53

Sunburst, Serial # A15572.

The Gibson ES-295 was introduced in 1952 as the full sized hollow body complement to the solid body Les Paul Model also debuting that year.  While the ES-295 shared the same flashy gold coloring of the Les Paul, along with the unique tailpiece, it was basically a fancier two-pickup version of the ES –175 (the two-pickup ES-175 D did not appear until 1953). The basic features of an ES-295 were: an all gold finish, two single coil P-90s with cream covers, a cream pickguard with gold floral designs, a Les Paul bridge/tailpiece combination, and gold plated metal parts.

 

The guitar featured is a typical 1953 ES-295 in every way except one: the color. While a tobacco sunburst finish was standard on most Gibsons from the ‘30s through the ‘50s, it is very rare to see an ES-295 in this color. The only other P-90 equipped ES-295 we know of was sold in 1999 at Eric Clapton’s Christie’s auction (two late ‘50s cherry sunburst humbucker equipped examples are also known to exist).

This one was found for me by my good friend and mentor, Jeff Hill.

 

Kay K592 Red Devil, 1963

Cherry, Not an expensive guitar, but this came into the shop and it was very clean with the original hardshell case, so I gave it a home in the collection.

 

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