Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Fender Stratocaster, '66

Candy Apple Red, Serial # 116384.

 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Charcoal Frost Metallic, Serial # 107518.

 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Ocean Turquoise, Serial # 107632, This is a nice custom color Strat with some honest playing wear. It is pictured on page 41 of the Vintage Guitar Book by Mac Yasuda.

 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Lake Placid Blue, Serial # 101113.

 

Fender Stratocaster, ’65

Sonic Blue, Serial # 104234. Guitar collectors consider 1965 to be one of the most significant years in history. It was the year that the large corporation Columbia Broadcasting Systems Inc. (CBS) bought Fender Instruments and Fender Sales.  To many players and collectors this year also marks the beginning of a decline in the quality of Fender products that continued through the 1970s.   The Stratocaster had been gradually evolving, along with the rest of the Fender line, since its debut in 1954. The most obvious change occurred in 1959 when the one-piece maple neck acquired a separate rosewood fingerboard. After the CBS buyout more changes took place, with the most dramatic being the enlargement of the headstock shape (coinciding with the popularity of bell-bottoms?) in December of 1965.   This rare 1965 Sonic Blue Strat has details common to Strats made during this transitional period. The November 1965 neck date shows that this is one of the last small headstock Strats made until the 1980s.  Other traits include Gold Transition Logo (designed by Fender photographer Bob Perine), pearloid position markers, double line Kluson Deluxe tuners, and an “F” stamp neck plate. This guitar also came stock from the factory with large frets (often seen in 1965).
 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Sunburst, Serial number L90333, This Strat has a maple cap fingerboard and it does not have the walnut skunk stripe on the back of the neck. We have seen this same fingerboard and neck configuration on a few Tele Customs from the same era. It would be safe to say that there are not many of these out there. This is certainly one rare and cool guitar!

 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Olympic White, Serial # L86093

 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Dakota Red, Serial # L64322.

This one has been in the collection for a very long time and was purchased back when clean custom color Strats were affordable, This one does have the previous owners social security number engraved on the neck plate and the fingerboard still has the grime from when it was out being played. What a great guitar indeed!

 

Fender Stratocaster, '65

Lake Placid Blue, Serial # L59451.

 

Gretsch Country Club, '62

Cadillac Green, Serial # 47040.

 
 

Gretsch Electro II, '53

Sunburst, Serial # 09618.

 

Gretsch White Falcon, ’58

White, Serial # 26356. The exciting changes in the popular music of the 1950s also called for electrifying transformations in musical instruments.  The electric guitar was increasingly prominent, so the top guitar companies battled to come up with the most innovative and attractive designs. The Fred Gretsch Company led the way as far as bright colors and fancy appointments go. Gretsch achieved the pinnacle of luxury and style with its piece de resistance the White Falcon. The 1955 Gretsch catalog stated that “Cost was never considered in the planning of this guitar. We were building an instrument for the artist-player whose caliber justifies and demands the utmost in striking beauty, luxurious styling, and peak tonal performance and who is willing to pay the price.”   The White Falcon was designed by Gretsch special representative, guitar promoter and demonstrator Jimmie Webster.  Webster drew ideas from a variety of sources including the gaudy Bacon and Day banjos of the Jazz Age.  The 17” wide body was finished in luminous white with gold sparkle binding. The hardware was gold with fancy jeweled knobs, Grover Imperial tuners, and a striking new tailpiece utilizing a V shape similar to the one used in the ‘50s Cadillac logo.  The gold pickguard was engraved with a flying Falcon.   The 1958 White Falcon pictured this month has features typical to that year’s model including:  a gold sparkle horizontal headstock logo inlaid in the white Nitron plastic veneer (changed from the original vertical logo in’58), Neo Classic thumbprint fingerboard inlays in an ebony board (changed from the original feather engraved hump-block inlays in ‘58), Patent Applied For Filtertron humbucking pickups (replacing DeArmond single coils), and a gold Space Control bridge (replacing the original Melita).   A New White Falcon sold for $675 in 1958.
 

Gretsch Country Gentleman, '65

Walnut, Serial # 79726.

 

Gretsch Tennessean, '61

Walnut, Serial # 44245.

 

Gretsch Roundup, '55

Western Orange, Serial # 13173.

 

Gretsch Roundup, ’57

Western Orange, Serial # 23405. By 1953, The Fred Grestch Manufacturing Company had been building drums banjos and guitars for 70 years. The traditional instrument maker made what seemed like a radical move by following the lead of Fender and Gibson in producing its own solid body guitar: the Duo Jet. While the Fender Telecaster’s ash body and the Gibson Les Paul’s mahogany/maple body were solid, the Gretsch Duo Jet’s mahogany body was nearly hollow to accommodate the electronics and wiring. The hollowed-out body was then covered with a pressed arched top. The black Duo-Jet was soon followed by a family of similar guitars with the main difference being the finish, as stated in the 1955 Gretsch catalog: “Offered in four models, each one a triumph of modernistic beauty and musical performance”. These guitars were (including the Duo Jet) the Silver Jet (silver sparkle), the Jet Fire Bird (red), and the Round-Up (western orange).   The Round-Up was devised in 1953 while Country & Western music was gaining recognition on the pop charts. It was aimed at enticing aspiring country guitarists with over-the-top cowboy style decorations.  The 1955 catalog described the guitar as having “Masculine beauty in real Western finish. Tooled leather shoulder strap and body binding; gold plated metal parts.” The fingerboard inlays were etched with the same steer head and cacti that appeared in the leather trim and strap. A pearloid steer head was also inlayed under the Gretsch logo on the headstock.  A dramatic “G” brand embellished the top (often knotty pine). These decorations were re-used the next year on the Chet Atkins signature models and the acoustic Rancher.   The 1957 Round-Up pictured shows the typical characteristics  identifying most 1957 model year Gretsches, which include: Humptop block fingerboard inlays(no etching), knobs indented with a “G” bisected by an arrow, and a long trussrod cover (1956). The Round-Up features that remained unchanged from the original version were the studded leather side trim, western belt buckle tailpiece, tortoiseshell pickguard decorated with a steer head (the steer head on the headstock had been replaced by a horseshoe), DeArmond single coil pickups, and Melita adjustable bridge. The original “G” brand had disappeared from the deep orange stained maple top by this time.  
 

Gretsch Jet Firebird, '57

Oriental Red, Serial # 23809.

Leo Fender’s revolutionary solid body guitars created quite a stir in the early 1950’s. The established guitar manufacturers of the day initially viewed the Fender solid bodies as ridiculous and ignored them-that is until the guitars started selling. The Gibson company was the first to realize there was money to be made and got together with the recording artist Les Paul (who had a number of recent hit records) to design its own fancier solid body called the Les Paul Model debuting in 1952. Seeing that Gibson was successful, the Fred Gretsch Company followed suit in 1953 with a similarly shaped guitar called the Duo Jet. By the time Gretsch’s 1955 catalogue appeared, the company offered a whole line of solid bodies: the Duo Jet, the Silver Jet, the Jet Firebird, the Roundup, and the Chet Atkins Solid body. Each of these was basically a Duo Jet with different cosmetic features.

This Gretsch Jet Firebird shares features common to all Jet’s of 1957: semi-solid body construction, Grover StaTite tuning machines, a rosewood fingerboard with humped-block inlays, a Melita Synchro-sonic adjustable bridge, and DeArmond Dynasonic single coil pickups made by Rowe Industries of Toledo Ohio. The features unique to a Model 6131 Jet Firebird are an Oriental Red top; black back, sides and neck, and a black pickguard with “GRETCH” in white letters.

Some players who at one time favored the twangy yet beefy sound of Dynasonic equipped Jets are Cliff Gallup, Bo Diddley, George Harrison, Billy Zoom, and Jeff Beck. 

 

Gretsch Silver Jet, '55

Silver Sparkle, Serial # 16622.

In 1953 the Gretsch Company introduced its first solidbody electric guitar: the Duo Jet. It was intended to compete with Fender’s Telecaster and Gibson’s Les Paul. The Duo Jet had a similar shape to the Les Paul, but instead of being truly solid, its separate pieces of mahogany had hollow spaces left open for electronics and wiring.  The pressed arched top was often covered in the same black plastic material used on some Gretsch drums.

The Duo Jet also included the innovative Melita Synchro – Sonic bridge which allowed separate intonation adjustment for each string.

 

While Gretsch was behind Fender and Gibson in the introduction of a solid body, they were ahead in eye catching colors. Each guitar received a different model name relating to its striking finish, even though it remained essentially a Duo Jet. These models were the Silver Jet (Sliver Sparkle), the Round Up (Orange with western style inlays and leather trim) and the Jet Firebird (Red).

 

This Silver Jet has all the features common to 1955 Jets: a rosewood fingerboard with large pearloid block inlays, chrome master volume, two individual pickup volumes and master tone controls all stamped with an arrow in the center, a small bullet shaped trussrod cover, two DeArmond single coil pickups, Melita Bridge, silver pickguard, and a chrome “G” cutout tailpiece. The feature unique to Silver Jets is the silver sparkle top made made from the same material Gretsch used to cover its drums. The 1955 Gretsch catalog lists a Silver Jet for $255.

 

Rickenbacker Doubleneck, '74

Fireglo, Serial # NF3602

 

Rickenbacker 330, '58

Reverse Fireglo, Serial # 2T179.

F.C. Hall purchased the Electro String Company from Adolf Rickenbacker in late 1953. This company had been known mostly for its electric steel guitars, but Hall revamped the business and focused on electric standard guitars (which continued to increase in popularity as the 1950s progressed). In early 1954 German guitar maker Roger Rossmeisl was hired, and his unique “old world” designs gave Rickenbacker guitars the distinctive look that continues today.

 

Rickenbacker developed a new series of guitars in 1958 that eventually evolved into some of the company’s most famous models. This was a line of thin semi-acoustic guitars known as the Capri series. These instruments started as a solid blocks of wood, which were then hollowed out to some extent from the back. A separate back was later attached. This method devised by Rossmeisl was very unusual compared to traditional techniques used by other companies.

 

This early 330 Rickenbacker has certain features that distinguish it from later incarnations. Prior to designing their own distinctive tailpieces, Rickenbacker used standard trapeze versions available in parts catalogs of the day. The single gold pick guard was soon replaced by a double level guard, which by 1964 was made of white plexiglas. The T.V. knobs and open back Grovers are other early features. The most unusual thing about this guitar is the rare “Reverse” Fireglo finish.

 

Rickenbacker 360, '59

Fireglo, Serial # 2T552.

 

Rickenbacker 365, '63

Fireglo, Serial # CG730.

 

Rickenbacker 365, '65

Fireglo, Serial # EI858.

 

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