Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Gibson Les Paul Standard, '59

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 9 1942, One of the most valuable and influential solid body electric guitars ever made. This one came from the family of the original owner. She played played this LP with her family band, The original purchase paperwork, her band poster, and set list are still in the original Lifton case. What a great history, and a great guitar!

 

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top, ’58

Serial # 8 1131 By the early 1950’s, popular recording artist Les Paul had been working on a solid body guitar for a number of years. Only the impressive sales of Fender’s solidbody, the Telecaster, finally convinced Gibson to consider his idea and come up with one of its own. Gibson approached Les Paul, and with his input the Les Paul Model solid body guitar was introduced in 1952. The model evolved through the 1950’s as practical improvements were made in its design.   This Les Paul is among  the last with the original gold colored finish ( the finish changed to cherry sunburst  later that year).This guitar shows all the improvements that were made up until 1958. These include the stop tailpiece (1954), the Tune-O-Matic Bridge (1956), and Patent Applied For (PAF) humbucking pickups (1957).   The humbucking pickup was well received when it came out in the ‘50s, but didn’t reach its full potential until the heavier rock and blues players of the late 1960’s discovered its capabilities. The PAF pickups used on the late ‘50s/early ‘60s Gibsons are still considered the best sounding humbuckers today.
 

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top, '57

Serial # 7 6172, All mahogany with a dark back, A very light 7.8 pounds, PAF's, and rings like a bell!

 

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top, '56

Serial # 614014, I kept this one to show the progression of the Les Paul. This guitar features the stop tail piece and the tune-o-matic bridge. The P90's would be replaced with the PAF's by the next year of production.

 

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top, '54

Serial # 4 3427, A very rare all gold version. They don't get any cleaner than this one.

 

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top, '53

Serial # 3 0602, I've had this one around forever! I've mostly kept it just to have an example of each version of the 50's Goldtop Les Paul. We've used it for various articles, photoshoots, and tabletop tennis. All kidding aside, another very clean 50's Goldtop.

 

Gibson Les Paul Goldtop '52

This is the earliest version of the Goltop Les Paul. It has the extra 2 screws in the bridge pickup and no neck binding. Historically interesting, but not much of a player with this combination bridge/tailpiece.

 

Gibson Les Paul Custom, '58

Ebony, Serial # 8 3775.

 

Gibson L-1, 1915

Natural, Serial # 21101

 

Gibson Everly Brothers Model, '67

Natural, Serial # 890855

 

Gibson J-45, '64

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 215778

This J-45 has the features common to others produced in 1964.  It has the adjustable bridge (introduced in 1956), large frets (1959), cherry sunburst (1962), and mahogany back and sides with spruce top (standard since the end of WW II).

The red tint of the cherry sunburst has faded to an almost golden color, which is common on J-45s made from ’64 through ’66.

 

The slim comfortable neck of this example has the somewhat rare and interesting feature called a “Stinger”. The back of the headstock is painted black to hide a flaw in the wood. The black paint ends in an attractive point at the bottom of the headstock while rest of the neck continues on in the usual see-through cherry.

 

Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, '75

Blue Sparkle, Serial # 393787

 

Gibson J-45, '47

The Gibson J-45 has been a favorite with players and collectors since its debut in 1942. Its roots can be traced back ten years earlier with the unveiling of the Martin Guitar Company’s Dreadnought series. The Martin D series became immediately popular with players because of the increased volume these large guitars provided. Gibson retaliated in 1934 with the Jumbo. The Jumbo was a guitar with similar dimensions and volume to the Dreadnought, but with Gibson’s unique round-shouldered look that’s been considered a classic shape ever since.  The economics of the Great Depression caused the Jumbo to evolve into the lower priced, less fancy J-35 in 1936. By 1942 the J-35 was dropped in favor of the enduring J-45, which has been a staple of the Gibson Flat-Top line up ever since.

 

Gibson L-00, '40

Sunburst, Serial # FG-2457.

 

Gibson L- Century, '37

During the years 1933 and 1934 Chicago held a World’s Fair commemorating the “Century of Progress” since the time of its incorporation. The fair was meant to stimulate the local economy during the crisis of the Great Depression. It was very successful and well attended.

 

 The World’s Fair received a great deal of interest from around the world; especially in nearby areas like Kalamazoo, Michigan home of the Gibson Company. Gibson decided to use the “Century of Progress” idea to name a new high end flat-top guitar. The L-Century was the result, and it was produced from 1933 through 1941.

 

 Gibson had introduced its L-series of flattops in 1926, and by 1933 offered several different models at various prices. The L-Century had the same measurements as the other L-models: 14 and ¾’ wide and 19 and ¼” long. The other differences were the use of maple for the back and sides (instead of mahogany), and of course the eye catching pearloid material covering the entire fingerboard and headstock.

 

Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, '75

Red Sparkle, Serial # 398970

 

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