Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
Hide Description

Filter By: Hide Filtering  

  • Gibson X
 

   

Viewing 101 - 125 of 148View All

 

Gibson Flying V, '59

Natural Korina,

Competition with other companies has always pressed Gibson into coming up with its most innovative designs. The rivalry with Epiphone in the 1920s and 1930s encouraged both companies to produce the finest acoustic archtop guitars of all time.

By the 1950s when amplified guitars had gained prominence, a new company entered the competition: Fender. Its founder Leo Fender had developed the first mass produced solid body electric guitar. Gibson president Ted McCarty took notice when the Fender Telecaster’s sales became significant, and developed a fancier solid body for Gibson with the help of guitar wizard, Les Paul.  The classy looking Les Paul Model in turn, inspired Leo to come up with his futuristic masterpiece, the Stratocaster.

When Ted McCarty saw that the Fender Stratocaster was selling, he decided that Gibson needed to come up some wild, exciting designs of its own so as not to be seen as old-fashioned and conservative. After examining the designs of several artists (including himself), McCarty choose three designs to have patented in June of 1957. These were the Explorer, the Modern and the Flying V.

The patents were granted in January of 1958. While prototypes of each were made, only the Explorer and the Flying V made it into production.

 

These Flying Vs and Explorers of the late ‘50s were made of a light colored African mahogany called Korina. McCarty chose this wood because blonde hued furniture was popular at the time, and no additional bleaching or tinting was required. These “Modernistic” guitars initially created the excitement they were meant to, but didn’t catch on with the guitar buying public until years after the initial small run had been discontinued. More info

Formerly owned by my friend & mentor Pete Alenov (may he rest in peace), He taught me a lot about the guitar business, and I think of him whenever I look at this one. This V was featured on the January 2006 Vintage Guitar Magazine cover!

 

Gibson Moderne, ’82

Natural, Serial # A 057.
 

Gibson Moderne, '83

Ebony, Serial # F 014.

 

Gibson Firebird VII, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 171666.

I purchased this one from the original owner. It took me 15 years to convince him to sell it to me! This one is on the cover of the October 2005 Vintage Guitar magazine.

 

Gibson Firebird V, '64

Cherry, Serial # 191345.

Any of these in custom colors are hard to find! I'm really fond of this one.

 

Gibson Firebird III, '64

Pelham Blue, Serial # 183117.

 

Gibson Firebird III, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 190492.

 

Gibson Firebird III, '65

Sunburst, Serial # 258940.

Transitional model with reverse body, P-90 pickups, and Kluson strip tuners instead of banjo tuners! Very rare!

 

Gibson Firebird I, '64

Cardinal Red, Serial # 191966.

Firebird I's are hard to find in Sunburst, but custom colors are very rare indeed! My good friend Paul Munden found this one for me and I am grateful to him for sending it my way!

 

Gibson Firebird I, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 179985.

 

Gibson Thunderbird Bass, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 198742.

 

Gibson Firebird V, '66

Sunburst, Serial # 851851.

Non Reverse

 

Gibson SG Junior Tenor, '66

Cherry, Serial # 407024.

 

Gibson SG Junior, '64

White, Serial # 168571, Just a nice clean guitar!

 

Gibson SG Special, '61

Cherry, Serial # 13264.

 

Gibson SG Special, '61

TV Yellow, Seial # 30651.

 

Gibson SG Special, '63

White, Serial # 124359.

 

Gibson SG Standard, '65

Pelham Blue, Serial # 505348.

By the time this guitar was made in 1965, Les Paul’s endorsement deal had ended (1963). The entire line became officially known as SGs. This SG Standard has features common to this transitional year, which are: a narrow 1 and 9/16” nut, chrome pickup covers and Vibrola, nickel ABR-1 Bridge, and small pickguard.

 

This SG is painted in the popular Pelham Blue Poly (Poly indicates a metallic finish, not Polyurethane) which was introduced along with nine other Custom Colors when the Firebird series debuted in 1963. Pelham Blue Poly is a lighter version of Fender’s Lake Placed Blue, and also tended to turn a more greenish color with age.

Dave's notes: I bought this one from a good friend (Rob Mason) at a Chicago show years ago. We had Gibson build a run of Historic SGs in this color based on this guitar!

 

Gibson SG Standard, '64

Cherry, Serial # 207310.

 

Gibson SG Standard, '64

Cherry, Serial # 178741

 

Gibson Les Paul Standard, '61

Cherry, Serial # 15288.

By 1960 poor sales of the original single cutaway Les Paul guitars caused Gibson to design a new more modern Les Paul model to compete with Fender’s popular double cutaway contoured solid body guitars. The result was what is today called the SG (Solid Guitar). This new version of the Les Paul had a slim lightweight mahogany body contoured with comfortable beveled edges. The two cutaways enabled players full and easy use of the 22 fret fingerboard. By 1961 the entire Les Paul line adopted the new shape.

 

Gibson Les Paul Custom, ’61

White, Serial # 3690. Sales for the original single cutaway Les Paul Standards and Customs were dropping by the end of the ‘50s. This led Gibson President Ted McCarty to have the guitars revamped in 1960 for release in 1961. The new Les Paul's double cutaway, lightweight bodies with contoured edges were influenced by players’ requests for lighter, more comfortable guitars with easy access to the high frets.  The popularity of Fender’s Stratocaster and Jazzmaster guitars was also a factor in redesigning the Gibson solid body line. The Les Paul Standard was the first solid body to receive the new design, with the Les Paul Custom following soon after. The guitars measured 12 and ¾” wide, 16” long, and 1 and 5/16 ” thin (the old single cutaway LPs had measured 12 and ¾” wide, 17 and ¼” long, and 1 and ¾” thin). The new Les Paul kept the 24 and ¾“scale on a 22 fret neck. The Standard’s mahogany body (minus the maple cap of the old version) was stained cherry red, while the Custom was finished in “gleaming white” (rather than black like the original Custom). The Les Paul Custom retained the split diamond headstock inlay and gold hardware of its predecessor. The new Les Pauls were also equipped with the newly designed (and soon abandoned) “sidewinder” vibrato.     The 1961 Les Paul Custom pictured matches the details provided in Gibson’s 1961 catalog: -          Ultra thin, hand contoured, double cutaway body -          New extra slim, fast, low-action neck – with exclusive extra low frets – joins body at 22nd fret -          One-piece mahogany neck with adjustable truss rod -          Ebony fingerboard, deluxe pearl inlays -          Adjustable Tune-O-Matic bridge -          Three powerful, humbucking pickups with unique wiring arrangement -          Two sets of tone and volume controls -          Three-way specially wired toggle switch -          New Gibson Vibrato – operates in direction of pick stroke;  swings out of way for rhythm playing
 

Gibson Korina Tribute Les Paul '08

Natural, One of the newest guitars in the collection, but I couldn't resist! Gibson was scheduled to build 100 of these in 2008 as a 50th Anniversary Tribute, but they did not go over very well and I think they ended up building around 80 of them. I loved them but the general public did not agree with me!

 

Gibson Les Paul Standard, '59

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 9 1942, One of the most valuable and influential solid body electric guitars ever made. This one came from the family of the original owner. She played played this LP with her family band, The original purchase paperwork, her band poster, and set list are still in the original Lifton case. What a great history, and a great guitar!

 

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top, ’58

Serial # 8 1131 By the early 1950’s, popular recording artist Les Paul had been working on a solid body guitar for a number of years. Only the impressive sales of Fender’s solidbody, the Telecaster, finally convinced Gibson to consider his idea and come up with one of its own. Gibson approached Les Paul, and with his input the Les Paul Model solid body guitar was introduced in 1952. The model evolved through the 1950’s as practical improvements were made in its design.   This Les Paul is among  the last with the original gold colored finish ( the finish changed to cherry sunburst  later that year).This guitar shows all the improvements that were made up until 1958. These include the stop tailpiece (1954), the Tune-O-Matic Bridge (1956), and Patent Applied For (PAF) humbucking pickups (1957).   The humbucking pickup was well received when it came out in the ‘50s, but didn’t reach its full potential until the heavier rock and blues players of the late 1960’s discovered its capabilities. The PAF pickups used on the late ‘50s/early ‘60s Gibsons are still considered the best sounding humbuckers today.
 

Viewing 101 - 125 of 148View All