Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Gibson ES-350T, '62

Natural, Serial # 41605.

I bought this one from a local pedal steel player about 15 years ago. He had had his initials engraved on the truss rod cover and pickguard. I thought it was such a great personal touch that I've never been tempted to change it!

 

Gibson ES-350T, '62

Sunburst, Serial # 76476.

 

Gibson ES-350T, ’62

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 82657. Sharp cutaway, I have never seen another ES-350T in this color. This one is also nice and clean. Just had to keep it! In 1955 Gibson developed a line of thin-bodied electric guitars to appeal to players who wanted a smaller more comfortable instrument, but without the weight of a solid body guitar. This line consisted of three guitars: The top of the line Byrdland, the mid-priced ES-350T, and the economy ES-225T. The Byrdland was designed with the input of famous session guitarists Hank Garland and Billy Bird. It was meant to be a thin-bodied L-5 CES with a shorter 23 and ½” scale (instead of the L-5’s 25 and ½” scale). These same innovations were carried out on the full-bodied ES-350 making it the ES-350 T.   The ES-350 T with its laminated maple top, back, and sides was meant to be a more affordable version of the Byrdland (the Byrdland was originally $550, while the ES-350 T was $395). The 1962 Gibson catalog describes many other details: “Matching the all-around excellence of Gibson performance, this distinctive instrument has a thin, narrow, short-scale neck. The choice of many professionals who acclaim these design features, which permit the use of many chords previously beyond reach. Beautifully finished arched top and back of highly figured curly maple with matching curly maple rims, ivoroid binding and gold-plated metal parts.” The rosewood fingerboard with split parallelogram inlays, and crown headstock inlay were carried over from the the original full sized ES-350.   The 1962 ES-350 T pictured this month has all the features associated with the final incarnation of the model before its discontinuation in 1963 (a full scale version was reissued in 1978). These include two humbucking pickups (replacing P-90s in 1957), a deep Florentine cutaway (replacing the rounded Venetian style in 1961), and a 3-piece maple neck (replacing the original 2-piece in mid-1962). This example has a cherry sunburst rather than the typically seen tobacco sunburst. That may explain why “Custom” is engraved on the truss-rod cover.   The 1962 Gibson price list has a sunburst finish ES-350T at $485. A 603 Faultless, plush-lined case was an extra $56.
 

Gibson L-7ED, '51

Sunburst, Serial # A6788.

With rare McCarty double pickup!

 

Gibson L-7C, '62

Sunburst, Serial # 91553.

From the Pete Allenov collection!

 

Gibson ES-175D, '55

Natural, Serial # A21719.

 

Gibson ES-175D, '54

Sunburst, Serial # A17358.

 

Gibson ES-175, '64

Natural, Serial # 154560.

 

Gibson ES-175, '62

Cherry, Serial #48894.

A very rare color for this model!

 

Gibson SG TV, '60

TV Yellow, Serial # 0 9101.

The successful sales of the solid body Les Paul Model launched in 1952 convinced Gibson to expand the solid body line to include a variety of models aimed at players from beginner to professional. This led to the introduction of the low priced single pickup, flat bodied Les Paul Junior, and the high priced elaborately appointed Les Paul Custom in July of 1954. By 1955 the Les Paul line also included the Les Paul TV and the Les Paul Special.

 

The Les Paul TV was the same as a Junior except for having a bright “limed mahogany” finish (some early TVs had maple bodies) instead of the regular sunburst. The Les Paul Juniors and TVs may have been inexpensive student guitars, but they were built with high quality and playability to encourage beginners to stick with the guitar and eventually want to move up to more expensive Gibsons.

 

In July of 1958 the TV and Junior models received a radical makeover. A new double-cutaway shape was instated that allowed a player full access to the fingerboard. The Junior’s color changed to transparent cherry, while the TV’s limed mahogany became a brighter yellow.  Attractive Tortoise pickguards rounded out the new color-scheme. By 1960 the TV lost the “Les Paul” portion of its name becoming instead the SG (solid guitar) TV. This name predated the pointed cutaway SG shape that came along in 1961.

 

Gibson Les Paul TV Model, '56

Limed Mahogany, Serial # 614478.

 

Gibson Les Paul Special, '59

Cherry, Serial # 923508.

 

Gibson Les Paul Special, '60

TV Yellow, Seial # 011888.

 

Gibson Les Paul Special, '56

Limed Mahogany, Serial # 6 3202.

 

Gibson Barney Kessel Standard, ’68

Cherry Sunburst, Serial # 895535. The Barney Kessel model was introduced in 1961 with input from the famous jazz guitarist. Kessel was a well known stylist and sought after session musician who backed Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, and many others. His innovative guitar work and arranging for Julie London in the ‘50s established his ability to provide orchestral sounding accompaniment with only an electric guitar and upright bass. The Barney Kessel model came in two versions: the Regular (pictured) and the fancier Custom.
 

Gibson Tal Farlow, '63

Viceroy Brown Sunburst, Serial # 63184.

 

Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, '73

Sunburst, Serial # 100774.

 

Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, '71

Sunburst, Serial # 971758.

 

Gibson Bicentennial Firebird '76

Sunburst, With the red, white and blue bird on the guard.

 

Gibson Explorer, '76

Natural, Serial # 00230419.

 

Gibson Explorer Reissue, '91

Natural Korina, Serial # 9 1002.

This is the prototype for the Historic '59 Explorer Reissue. It was pictured in the first Gibson Historic Series Catalog.

 

Gibson Explorer, '59

Natural Korina, Serial number 9 1995.

Purchased at a Dallas Show in the early 90's, I remember thinking at the time that if I didn't buy this one, I'd never be able find another. They are pretty scarce!

 

Gibson Flying V Reissue, '91

Natural Korina, Serial # 9 1001.

This is the prototype for the Historic '59 Flying V Reissue. It was pictured in the first Gibson Historic Series Catalog.

 

Gibson Flying V, '59

Natural Korina,

Competition with other companies has always pressed Gibson into coming up with its most innovative designs. The rivalry with Epiphone in the 1920s and 1930s encouraged both companies to produce the finest acoustic archtop guitars of all time.

By the 1950s when amplified guitars had gained prominence, a new company entered the competition: Fender. Its founder Leo Fender had developed the first mass produced solid body electric guitar. Gibson president Ted McCarty took notice when the Fender Telecaster’s sales became significant, and developed a fancier solid body for Gibson with the help of guitar wizard, Les Paul.  The classy looking Les Paul Model in turn, inspired Leo to come up with his futuristic masterpiece, the Stratocaster.

When Ted McCarty saw that the Fender Stratocaster was selling, he decided that Gibson needed to come up some wild, exciting designs of its own so as not to be seen as old-fashioned and conservative. After examining the designs of several artists (including himself), McCarty choose three designs to have patented in June of 1957. These were the Explorer, the Modern and the Flying V.

The patents were granted in January of 1958. While prototypes of each were made, only the Explorer and the Flying V made it into production.

 

These Flying Vs and Explorers of the late ‘50s were made of a light colored African mahogany called Korina. McCarty chose this wood because blonde hued furniture was popular at the time, and no additional bleaching or tinting was required. These “Modernistic” guitars initially created the excitement they were meant to, but didn’t catch on with the guitar buying public until years after the initial small run had been discontinued. More info

Formerly owned by my friend & mentor Pete Alenov (may he rest in peace), He taught me a lot about the guitar business, and I think of him whenever I look at this one. This V was featured on the January 2006 Vintage Guitar Magazine cover!

 

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