Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Viewing 51 - 75 of 156View All

 

Gibson ES-340TD, Early 70's

Natural, An unusual version of an ES-335 with a 3 piece maple neck.

 

Gibson ES-150 '69

Natural, These look a lot like an ES-335, but they are completely hollow and much thicker. These never really did catch on in the vintage market, but I've always been a fan of them, especially in Natural!

 

Gibson ES-295, '53

Sunburst, Serial # A15572.

The Gibson ES-295 was introduced in 1952 as the full sized hollow body complement to the solid body Les Paul Model also debuting that year.  While the ES-295 shared the same flashy gold coloring of the Les Paul, along with the unique tailpiece, it was basically a fancier two-pickup version of the ES –175 (the two-pickup ES-175 D did not appear until 1953). The basic features of an ES-295 were: an all gold finish, two single coil P-90s with cream covers, a cream pickguard with gold floral designs, a Les Paul bridge/tailpiece combination, and gold plated metal parts.

 

The guitar featured is a typical 1953 ES-295 in every way except one: the color. While a tobacco sunburst finish was standard on most Gibsons from the ‘30s through the ‘50s, it is very rare to see an ES-295 in this color. The only other P-90 equipped ES-295 we know of was sold in 1999 at Eric Clapton’s Christie’s auction (two late ‘50s cherry sunburst humbucker equipped examples are also known to exist).

This one was found for me by my good friend and mentor, Jeff Hill.

 

Gibson ES-225 TDN, ’59

Natural In 1955 Gibson developed a line of thin-bodied electric guitars to appeal to players wanting a smaller more comfortable instrument, but without the weight of a solid body guitar. This line consisted of three guitars: The upscale Byrdland, the mid-priced ES-350T, and the economy ES-225T.   The ES-225T looked much like a plainer ES-175, but measured only 1 and ¾” deep (compared to the ES-175’s 3 and 3/8” depth). When it first debuted in the summer of 1955, it had only a single pickup mid-way between the neck and the bridge. By the summer of 1956, successful sales drove Gibson to introduce a natural finish option, and a two pickup version. The 1959 Gibson catalog states: “The ES-225T series of thin-bodied, cutaway guitars offer outstanding professional instruments in the popular priced field. Combining the rigidity and tone features of a solid body guitar with the light weight, easy-to-hold shape of conventional styling, these instruments are available in single or double pickup models.”   The 1959 ES-225 TDN pictured has all the features typical of that model including: a laminated maple top, back and sides, a single bound top and back, 24 and ¾” scale mahogany neck with bound 20 fret rosewood fingerboard, and two P-90 single coil pickups. The strings are held in place by an original Les Paul style combination bridge-tailpiece.
 

Gibson ES-295, '52

Gold, Serial # A11855.

You do not see these very often, This one is a bit weather checked and way too cool!

 

Gibson ES-175, '61

Sunburst, Serial # A35924.

A very clean guitar that is a recent addition to the collection. This is complete with the Brown case, all of the hang tags, and the paperwork. The original sales receipt that is dated July 8, 1961 is also included. This guitar sold new for $249.50 and the case was an extra $47.00. What are the chances of the $30 trade credit being for a Danelectro or a Silvertone? One can only imagine.

 

Gibson ES-175, '62

Sunburst, Serial # 85879.

 

Gibson ES-335, '58

Sunburst, Serial # A28163.

 In the late ‘50s Gibson designed a guitar meant to have the look and feel of a traditional hollowbody, while also having the sonic advantages of a solid body guitar (still new and not universally accepted). The ES-335 was the result.

 This example has features common to most late ‘50s 335s: dot inlays, long pickguard, see-through gold bell knobs, and PAF humbuckers.

Early ES-335s, including this one, often have shallow neck angles. The ABR-1 bridges on these guitars are shaved much thinner than usual to accommodate the neck angle.

Factory installed Bigsbys were also a common feature on ES-335s of the ‘50s and ‘60s. What makes this guitar unusual is the lack of stop tailpiece holes or “Custom Made” plaque usually seen on Bigsby equipped 335s.

 I purchased this guitar from a good friend & fellow dealer in Iowa about 20 years ago. Not the best playing ES-335 that I own (because of the shallow neck angle) but definitely a historically significant guitar that I treasure. 

 

Gibson ES-335, '61

Cherry, Serial # A35742.

 

Gibson ES-335, '61

Sunburst, #10086.

 

Gibson ES-335, '63

Sunburst, #139877.

 

Gibson ES-335, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 66165.

 

Gibson ES-335, '64

Cherry, Serial # 147790.

 

Gibson ES-335, '62

Cherry, Serial # 51989.

 

Gibson ES-335, '63

Cherry, Serial # 113991.

 

Gibson ES-335, '67

Pelham Blue, Serial # 87604.

 

Gibson ES-335, '67

Sparkling Burgundy, Serial # 170009.

This guitar is weird not just because of the color, but because it has split parallelogram fingerboard inlays like an ES-345.

 

Gibson ES-330, '67

Sparkling Burgundy, Serial # 064094.

 

Gibson ES-330, '61

Cherry, Serial # 19764.

 

Gibson Les Paul Custom, ’55

Ebony, Serial # 511553. The Gibson Les Paul Custom was formally unveiled at the July NAMM show in 1954, along with the Les Paul Junior. The two instruments were meant to increase the range of Gibson’s Les Paul solid body guitars by adding a fancier model and an economy model.  The Les Paul Custom’s sumptuous looks and special low smooth frets earned it the nicknames the “Black Beauty” and “the Fretless Wonder”.   The 1955 Gibson catalog describes the Custom’s unique features: “Solid Honduras Mahogany body with carved top, size 17 ¼” long, 12 ¾” wide, 1 ¾” thick with graceful cutaway design; bound with alternating white and black strips on top and bottom of body. Mahogany neck, with exclusive Gibson Truss Rod construction; ebony fingerboard; deluxe pearl inlays.” The luxury treatment continued with the split diamond pearl headstock inlay previously reserved only for the Super 400. Another feature, until that time used only on high end archtops, was the new powerful Alnico V pickup (in the neck position). The Custom was also the first Les Paul to receive the innovative Tune-O-matic Bridge, which allowed for individual string intonation.   While the Les Paul Custom’s looks and darker sounds (due to the all-mahogany construction and deep sounding neck pickup) were aimed at refined jazz players, rock ‘n roll and pop musicians were also attracted to the instrument. Chuck Berry, Franny Beecher (Bill Haley & His Comets), Robby Krieger (The Doors) and of course Les Paul himself, are a few well known players who favored the first version Les Paul Custom at one time.
 

Gibson ES-350T, '57

Sunburst, Serial # A25794.

 

Gibson ES-350T, '58

Natural, Serial # A28534.

By the mid- 1950’s electric guitar players had two choices: either a full hollowbody electric guitar or a compact solidbody. Gibson had been receiving requests from players for something in-between the two styles, so in 1955 the first Thinline Electrics were developed. They were the high-end Byrdland, the ES-350T, and the low-end ES-225T.

 

The Byrdland was conceived with input from session guitarists Hank Garland and Billy Byrd. It was basically a thin-bodied L-5 with a 2 and ¼” thick body (instead of 3 and 3/8”) and a shorter scale of 23 and ½” (instead of 25 and ½”). The shorter scale was meant to make difficult new jazz chords easier to play. It also allowed room for two extra frets (22 total).

 

The ES 350T was meant to be an affordable, less fancy version of the Byrdland with the same groundbreaking improvements and dimensions. The ES-350T adopted the cosmetic features of its full-sized predecessor the ES-350: two P-90 pickups, laminated maple top, sides, and back, rosewood fingerboard with split parallelogram inlays, and a crown headstock inlay.

 

The stunning example shown on these pages was made in 1958, and is one of only 43 natural models made that year (the other 104 were sunburst). This guitar sports the Patent Applied For humbucking pickups that became standard equipment on the model in 1957. It is also adorned with an attractive, but non-stock Bigsby vibrato tailpiece (instead of the W-shaped original).

 

The Gibson ES-350T is most often associated with Rock ‘n Roll founding father Chuck Berry, but it was also used over the years by Eric Clapton and Danny Gatton.

 

Gibson ES-350T, '57

Sunburst, Serial # A24780.

This one has a Byrdland tailpiece!

 

Gibson Byrdland, '61

Natural, Serial # 35014.

 

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