Browse Dave’s Collection

“Welcome to the guitar collection. On the second floor of our store we have on display over 300 guitars and more than 50 amps that I’ve accumulated over the years. The friends and customers that have visited us seem to really appreciate being able to view this, so we thought we would share it with our online friends and fellow guitar enthusiasts as well. Enjoy!”

- Dave Rogers

The items in Dave’s Collection are not available for purchase.
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Gibson L-5, ’52

Sunburst, Serial # A9470. This one just came into the shop recently. A Beautiful example of an Early 50's L-5. Orville Gibson’s innovative carved top and back fretted instruments (inspired by the construction methods for violins) brought the company he founded great success in the early 1900’s. By the early 1920’s Gibson’s acoustic engineer Lloyd Loar and his team took the violin inspiration a step further by designing a family of high quality fretted instruments with “f” holes. This family included the legendary L-5 guitar and F-5 mandolin.   From the time of its introduction in 1922 until today, the L-5 has been considered one of the finest jazz guitars. Jazz greats Eddie Lang, Allan Reuss, and Wes Montgomery played versions of the classic guitar. It evolved from its original 16” width to its current 17” width in 1934. By 1939, it gained a cutaway. The guitar became electrified with pickups by 1951.   This L-5 is a non-cutaway acoustic version dating to 1952. While both cutaway acoustic and electric versions were available that year, Gibson still provided a guitar for players specializing in rhythm only type jazz playing. The interest in these non-cutaway acoustics gradually dwindled throughout the ‘50s. In 1952, 27 non-cutaway L-5s were produced, whereas in 1958 only 5 were made. The non-cutaway L-5 was discontinued at the end of that year, and was not seen again until the 16” version was reissued in the ‘90s.   The 1952 L-5 pictured has all the characteristics common to that year. These include the well-known  mother-of-pearl flower pot (torch) headstock inlay, modern style Gibson logo (replacing the script logo in 1949), gold Kluson Sealfast tuners with plastic buttons, two piece curly maple neck with mahogany center strip and bound ebony fingerboard, 17” wide body with solid maple back and sides with spruce top, and the classic art deco tailpiece.
 

Gibson ES-350, '56

Natural, Serial # A22080. Very Rare Spruce Top.

 

Gibson Moderne, '83

Natural, Serial # G-077.

 

Gibson Firebird III, ’64

Cherry, Serial # 217819. Rare Custom Color.
 

Gibson ES-335, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 69281.

 

Gibson ES-345, '62

Cherry, Serial # 46819.

 

Gibson ES-335, '60

Sunburst, Serial # A35136.

 

Gibson ES-335, '63

Cherry, Serial # 137285.

 

Gibson ES-350T, '57

Sunburst, Serial # A25130.

 

Gibson ES-350 Tenor, '55

Natural, Serial # A5824.

As the Jazz Age matured in the 1930’s, the loud rhythmic pulse of the banjo gave way to silky even tones of the archtop guitar. The popularity of Bing Crosby and his virtuoso guitarist Eddie Lang, inspired band leaders to replace the banjo with the guitar. Banjo players wanting to continue working had to learn the guitar.  To aid those players not wanting to learn a whole new system of fingering, Gibson offered a four stringed tenor guitar with the same tuning as the four stringed tenor banjo.  Most standard guitar models could be special ordered with a tenor neck (We have seen examples into the ‘60s).

 

 

This guitar is, according to the label, an ES-350 T.G. (tenor guitar).  The features, which include a thick full sized body, individual gold bonnet tone and volume knobs for each pickup, and a three way toggle switch, seem to date the guitar to 1955. The serial number, on the other hand, dates the guitar at 1950.  Could it be that the guitar was started in 1950 and shelved until 1955 when a tenor guitar order came through? We may never know. The last unique finishing touch is “bow tie” banjo inlays on the fingerboard.

 

We’ve been looking for a thick bodied ES-350 with the four-knob layout for a long time (if anyone has one, please contact us) so it’s ironic that when one finally shows up, it’s a tenor!

 

Gibson ES-355 '65

Sparkling Burgundy, The face has faded to an interesting gold color! Some nasty Gibson/Schaller tuners installed, but since the damage was already done, I left them alone.

 

Gibson ES-355 '60

Cherry, Serial #A32582. A very clean example with just a bit of gold plating wear.

 

Gibson ES-345, '64

Sunburst, Serial # 176409.

 

Gibson ES-345 '60

Cherry, Serial #A34224. The color has faded nicely on this one. A nice early '60 with the long guard and clear knobs.

 

Gibson ES-345 '59

Sunburst, Serial #A31007. The gold plating is a bit worn and the tuners are starting to shrivel up, but this is a great guitar. I love the late 50's/early 60's ES series guitars when they have the stop tailpiece!

 

Gibson ES-345 '60

Sunburst, Serial #A32846, An early '60 with the clear top knobs and the long guard.

 

Gibson Prototype Bass, Mid 70's

Cherry Sunburst, I've never seen another one like this and probably for a good reason! It is an odd duck, that's for sure!

 

Gibson Map Guitar '84

Natural, Kind of a silly thing. I think these were mostly meant as a promotional item, but this guitar gets some of the most attention of anything in the collection from the non-guitar type folks.

 

Gibson ES-340TD, Early 70's

Natural, An unusual version of an ES-335 with a 3 piece maple neck.

 

Gibson ES-150 '69

Natural, These look a lot like an ES-335, but they are completely hollow and much thicker. These never really did catch on in the vintage market, but I've always been a fan of them, especially in Natural!

 

Gibson ES-295, '53

Sunburst, Serial # A15572.

The Gibson ES-295 was introduced in 1952 as the full sized hollow body complement to the solid body Les Paul Model also debuting that year.  While the ES-295 shared the same flashy gold coloring of the Les Paul, along with the unique tailpiece, it was basically a fancier two-pickup version of the ES –175 (the two-pickup ES-175 D did not appear until 1953). The basic features of an ES-295 were: an all gold finish, two single coil P-90s with cream covers, a cream pickguard with gold floral designs, a Les Paul bridge/tailpiece combination, and gold plated metal parts.

 

The guitar featured is a typical 1953 ES-295 in every way except one: the color. While a tobacco sunburst finish was standard on most Gibsons from the ‘30s through the ‘50s, it is very rare to see an ES-295 in this color. The only other P-90 equipped ES-295 we know of was sold in 1999 at Eric Clapton’s Christie’s auction (two late ‘50s cherry sunburst humbucker equipped examples are also known to exist).

This one was found for me by my good friend and mentor, Jeff Hill.

 

Gibson ES-225 TDN, ’59

Natural In 1955 Gibson developed a line of thin-bodied electric guitars to appeal to players wanting a smaller more comfortable instrument, but without the weight of a solid body guitar. This line consisted of three guitars: The upscale Byrdland, the mid-priced ES-350T, and the economy ES-225T.   The ES-225T looked much like a plainer ES-175, but measured only 1 and ¾” deep (compared to the ES-175’s 3 and 3/8” depth). When it first debuted in the summer of 1955, it had only a single pickup mid-way between the neck and the bridge. By the summer of 1956, successful sales drove Gibson to introduce a natural finish option, and a two pickup version. The 1959 Gibson catalog states: “The ES-225T series of thin-bodied, cutaway guitars offer outstanding professional instruments in the popular priced field. Combining the rigidity and tone features of a solid body guitar with the light weight, easy-to-hold shape of conventional styling, these instruments are available in single or double pickup models.”   The 1959 ES-225 TDN pictured has all the features typical of that model including: a laminated maple top, back and sides, a single bound top and back, 24 and ¾” scale mahogany neck with bound 20 fret rosewood fingerboard, and two P-90 single coil pickups. The strings are held in place by an original Les Paul style combination bridge-tailpiece.
 

Gibson ES-295, '52

Gold, Serial # A11855.

You do not see these very often, This one is a bit weather checked and way too cool!

 

Gibson ES-175, '61

Sunburst, Serial # A35924.

A very clean guitar that is a recent addition to the collection. This is complete with the Brown case, all of the hang tags, and the paperwork. The original sales receipt that is dated July 8, 1961 is also included. This guitar sold new for $249.50 and the case was an extra $47.00. What are the chances of the $30 trade credit being for a Danelectro or a Silvertone? One can only imagine.

 

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